Hooks My Crochet Patterns

Free crochet pattern: Easy angled pocket shawl

What could be more comforting than wrapping up in something that's warm and cozy - and as a bonus, has pockets!

To purchase a printable, ad-free version of this pattern with expanded instructions for just $2, visit ravelry.com/patterns/library/easy-angled-pocket-shawl.

If ever there was a year when we needed pocket shawls, 2020 is that year. I mean, what could be more comforting during this crazy, scary pandemic than wrapping up in something that’s warm and cozy – and as a bonus, has pockets!

I prefer sweaters and coats with angled pockets so that it’s easy to slip one’s hands into them, so I designed my pocket shawl pattern accordingly.

Don’t worry though – this pattern is deceptively easy to make and is appropriate for advanced beginners on up. The pattern is broken down into four easy steps, illustrated with diagrams and photos.

The pattern shows how to make this pocket shawl in two different yarns – Lion Brand Comfy Cotton Blend (weight 3) and Lion Brand Scarfie (weight 5 wool blend), but is easily adapted to work with any weight 3, 4 or 5 yarn of your choice.

It works up quickly (especially with thicker yarns) and would make a great gift!

Pattern: Easy angled pocket shawl

Materials needed

  • 3 skeins Lion Brand Comfy Cotton Blend yarn (weight 3) and a size Size J crochet hook
    OR 4 skeins Lion Brand Jeans yarn (weight 4) and a size I crochet hook
    OR 2½ skeins Lion Brand Scarfie yarn and a size K crochet hook
    OR equivalent yardage of a weight 3, 4 or 5 yarn of your choice, and appropriate size crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle
  • Stitch markers or safety pins

Stitches used

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Single crochet (sc)
  • Half-double crochet (hdc)
  • Half-double crochet 2 together (hdc2tog)
  • Double crochet (dc)
  • Front-post double crochet (fpdc)
  • Back-post double crochet (bpdc)
  • Foundation half double crochet (fhdc) – optional

Sizing

The pattern as written will make a shawl that is 16” wide and 56” long, which will fit most adults and teens. Instructions are included in the pattern to make size adjustments. Keep in mind that If you make a shawl larger than 56” x 16”, you may need additional yarn.

How the shawl is constructed

The shawl is worked in four sections. They are numbered below to indicate the order in which they are worked.

  1. Front/pocket section – This section is worked first because it is made 20” longer than the finished shawl. A 10” flap is folded over on each side to form the pockets.
  2. Front border – Working this on the front edge of the front/pocket section also serves to stitch closed the front seams of the pockets.
  3. Back section – Working this on the back edge of the front/pocket section also serves to stitch closed the back seams of the pockets.
  4. Back border – Identical to the front border.

About gauge

With this pattern, gauge is not important. What matters is that you match the dimensions of each section as specified.

Turning chain

Throughout this pattern, the turning chain does NOT count as a stitch. Therefore, do NOT skip the first stitch when beginning a new row.

Step 1: Front/pocket section

Row 1: Work a foundation row of hdc that is 76” long. You have two options for doing this:

  • Work a starting chain, then work hdc in 2nd chain from hook and remaining chains across.
  • OR, my preferred method: Work foundation hdc (fhdc) until row is 76” long. (If you’d like to learn how to work foundation stitches, see my tutorial video at https://youtu.be/Ld_-ZtCZdOI.)

Row 2: Ch 1 loosely (see note 1), turn;
hdc2tog in first 2 st, working through both loops (see note 2);
hdc back loop only (see note 3) in each st until 2 st remain;
hdc2tog in last 2 st, again working through both loops.

Repeat row 2 until piece is 7” to 8” wide. This will be the width of your pockets.

Notes:

  1. For this section only, the turning chain is one loose chain, instead of the two chains typical when working hdc – this keeps the angled edge smooth and gap-free.
  2. When working the decreases (hdc2tog), work through both loops of the stiches below – this creates a secure pocket edge.
  3. When working hdc between the pockets, work back loop only – this creates the ribbed effect.

Diagram:

Size adjustment: To make the shawl longer or shorter, work a longer or shorter foundation row, remembering that the length of the foundation row minus 20” is the length of the finished shawl.

Fold up 10” on either end of the long side; this will be about 5” on the short side. Take care that each stitch on the pocket flap aligns with a stitch on the body of the shawl. Pin the pocket flaps into place.

This turns the piece into a 56” long rectangle with an angled pocket on each end, ready for the sides to be stitched closed when the remaining sections are added.

Size adjustment: To change the depth of the pockets, work a longer or shorter foundation row when beginning this section, and fold up longer or shorter pocket flaps accordingly.

Diagram:

Step 2: Front border

Row 1: With pocket side facing and 10” pocket edges on top, connect yarn in rightmost paired st (working through both layers); ch 1; work sc in same st and then every st across, working through both layers at pocket flaps.

Row 2: ch 2, turn; hdc in first st; dc in each st across until 1 st remains; hdc in last st.

Row 3: ch 2, turn; hdc in top hdc of prev row; alternate fpdc, bpdc in each dc across; hdc in last st/hdc of prev row.

Row 4: ch 2, turn; hdc in top hdc of prev row; work fpdc in each bpdc of prev row and bpdc in each fpdc of prev row; hdc in last st/hdc of prev row.

Row 5: ch 1, turn; sc in first st and every st across.

Finish off and weave in end on back (non-pocket) side.

Closeup of the border.

Step 3: Back section

Row 1: With back side of previous row of hdc facing and 5” pocket edges on top, connect yarn in rightmost paired st (working through both layers);
ch 2; work hdc through both loops of both layers in same paired st and in all paired st across pocket;
between pockets, work hdc in back loop only;
at second pocket, work hdc through both loops of both layers.

Row 2: Ch 2, turn; work hdc in back loop only in each st across.

If your front border is 2” wide (as in these examples), repeat row 2 until piece is 14” wide. Adding the back border will complete the full width of 16”.

If your front border is some width other than 2”, continue adding rows to this section until the width of the piece is at least 16” minus width of front border.

Size adjustment: To make a wider shawl, simply work additional rows in this section.

Step 4: back border

Row 1: With pocket side facing, connect yarn in rightmost st; ch 1; work sc in same st and then every st across.

Row 2: ch 2, turn; hdc in first st; dc in each st across until 1 st remains; hdc in last st.

Row 3: ch 2, turn; hdc in top hdc of prev row; alternate fpdc, bpdc in each dc across; hdc in last st/hdc of prev row.

Row 4: ch 2, turn; hdc in top hdc of prev row; work fpdc in each bpdc of prev row and bpdc in each fpdc of prev row; hdc in last st/hdc of prev row.

Row 5: ch 1, turn; sc in first st and every st across.

Finish off and weave in end on back (non-pocket) side.

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any ponchos made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com, or tag with @spoonsandhooks on Instagram. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

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