Hooks Video

Free crochet pattern: Granny square cocoon cardigan

One of the great things about the Granny square cocoon cardigan is that it can be made in just three simple steps by anyone who has mastered basic crochet skills: chain stitch, slip stitch, single crochet and double crochet.

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One of the great things about the granny square cocoon cardigan is that it can be made in just three simple steps by anyone who has mastered basic crochet skills: chain stitch, slip stitch, single crochet and double crochet.

Another great thing about this pattern is that it’s so forgiving that gauge doesn’t matter. To get the correct size, all you need to do is make your granny square at least half as tall as the intended wearer of the cardigan, plus an extra inch or two. That’s step one.

To get the correct size, all you need to do is make your granny square at least half as tall as the intended wearer of the cardigan, plus an extra inch or two.

Step two is to fold the granny square in half and stitch up the side seams, leaving openings for armholes. Step three is to add a border of six rows of single crochet around the armholes and the front opening. That’s all there is to it!

The sample cardigan shown here, intended to be worn by someone who is 5’4″ (64″) or shorter, is based on a 33″ granny square made from 4 skeins of Lion Brand’s Heartland yarn, which works particularly well for this pattern. (It comes in numerous colors; I used the color “Redwood.”) To make a cardigan for someone taller than 5’4″ using this yarn, I recommend getting 5 skeins.

Here is a two-minute video showing the pattern basics. The written pattern follows below.

Pattern: Granny square cocoon cardigan

Materials you’ll need:

  • 4 or 5 skeins of Lion Brand’s Heartland yarn, depending on intended size of cardigan, or 1000-1250 yards of a medium weight (#4) yarn of your choice
  • Size J crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle

Stitches used

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)
  • Single crochet (sc)
  • Double crochet (dc)

To connect new skeins of yarn, I recommend using the Russian join, which reduces the number of weave-ins required.

Step 1: Crochet a BIG granny square

BIGgrannysquare-web

Ch 6 and join in a ring with sl st.

Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1st dc here and throughout), 2 dc in ring, ch 2, * (3 dc in ring, ch 2) 3 times, sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Tip: Lay yarn end along ring and crochet Round 1 over it for an effortless weave-in.

Round 2: Ch 3 and turn, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in ch 2 space to form a corner, (ch 1, 3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in 3 remaining ch 2 spaces, ch 1 and sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Round 3: Ch 3 and turn, (2 dc in ch 1 space), (ch 1, 3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in each ch 2 space in corner and (ch 1, 3 dc) in each ch 1 space on side, ch 1 and sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Repeat Round 3 until square reaches desired size.

Final round (“binding”): Ch 1 and turn, sc in each dc and through each ch 1 space on sides; in corners, 4 sc through ch 2 space; sl st in starting ch 1, cut 6” tail and fasten off.

Binding-corner-web.jpgDo 4 single crochet in chain-2 corners.

Step 2: Stitch together sides forming armholes

Fold square in half with right sides together to form a rectangle, taking care to align 3 dc clusters and ch 1 spaces to the clusters and spaces on the opposite side.

Note: If you made your granny square using the above instructions in which you turn the work after every round, both sides will probably look pretty much the same, and you can pick whichever side you like best to be the “right” side.

step2-web

Beginning 7” from fold, single crochet through all loops of “binding” (final round sc) to end of side and through first 2 ch of corner only.

Border-corner-web

Note: Beginning 7” from fold creates a 14” armhole which will fit most. If necessary, the armhole size can be adjusted smaller or larger by starting the side seam closer to or farther from the fold.

Cut 6” end and fasten off.

Repeat on other side.

Step 3: Add borders.

Step3-borders-web.jpg

For the front opening and both armholes:

Round 1: Join yarn with sl st in sc “binding” near one of the side seams made in Step 2, ch 1, sc in each sc of “binding” until you reach ch 1, sl st in ch 1.

Tip: Crochet Round 1 over yarn ends left from binding and side seams for effortless weave-ins.

Rounds 2-6: Ch 1 and turn, sc around front opening until you reach ch 1, sl st in ch 1.

Cut 6” end and fasten off.

Weave in ends. (If you crocheted over all previous yarn ends, and used the Russian join to add new skeins of yarn, you should only have three ends left to weave in.)

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any cardigans made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

See also my variation on this pattern, the self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan.

This granny square cocoon cardigan can be made in three easy steps by anyone who has mastered basic crochet skills

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3 comments on “Free crochet pattern: Granny square cocoon cardigan

  1. Thank you for the pattern. I am looking for one like this.

    Like

  2. Mara Stancavage

    Will this work for someone who is a 3X?

    Like

    • Mara – I have not made it in that size, but this is a loose and forgiving cardigan and I see no reason why you shouldn’t be able to. My advice is when you’ve made your square, before you stitch the seams, pin them and try it on, and then make it bigger if necessary (have extra yarn for this). You may want to adjust the armholes also. If you try it, I’d love to know how it works out!

      Like

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