Free crochet pattern: The “big hug” hooded cowl scarf

To purchase a printable, ad-free version of this pattern with a stitch count chart for just $2.50, https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/the-big-hug-hooded-cowl-scarf.

Maybe it’s because 2020 was such a very challenging year, but nearly everything I’ve been making lately has been the crochet version of a hug.

This hooded cowl scarf is definitely in that category. I took my two-in-one bandana cowl pattern and super-sized it, making the cowl long enough and wide enough to pull over the head as a hood, and making the “bandana” section into a big triangle scarf that’s wide enough to drape over the shoulders.

My hooded cowl scarf pattern…
…is a super-sized version of my two-in-one bandana cowl pattern.

The garment shown required one and a half Caron Cakes from the Lovely Layers Collection. I used the colorway “Sugar Plums.” Two regular Caron Cakes would also work.

Pattern: The “big hug” hooded cowl scarf

This pattern is worked from the top down in the round. It starts as a straight tube for the cowl/hood section, from which the scarf section flows naturally simply by adding an increase in the center front.

Materials needed

  • 2 Caron Cakes (or equivalent yardage of a weight 4 yarn of your choice)
  • Size J crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle
  • Stitch markers (can also use safety pins)

Stitches used

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Half-double crochet (hdc)
  • Half-double crochet front loop only (hdc flo)
  • Half-double crochet back loop only (hdc blo)
  • Bobbles (described in Round 8, below)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)

Stitch sequence for texture

The texture is created by repeating the eight rounds described below.

When working odd-numbered rounds, the right side is facing; when working even-numbered rounds, the wrong side is facing.

Note: To avoid a gap where rounds are joined in the back, the turning chain is not counted as a stitch in all rounds except Round 4 (spaced hdc). Therefore, the first stitch in each round is worked in the same stitch as the turning chain in Rounds 1-3 and 5-8. I find it helpful to place a stitch marker in the first stitch, so that at the end of the round I remember where to join.

Round 1 – hdc, through both loops
ch 1 very loosely, turn;
hdc in base of ch-1 and in each st around;
join with sl st in top of first hdc.

Round 2 – hdc in front loop only (flo) – forms single-line ridge on right side
ch 1 very loosely, turn;
hdc flo in base of ch-1 (place stitch marker) and in each st around;
join with sl st in top of first hdc.

Round 3 – hdc in back loop only (blo) – forms chain-like line on right side
ch 1 very loosely, turn;
hdc blo in base of ch-1 (place stitch marker) and in each st around;
join with sl st in top of first hdc.

Round 4 – spaced hdc, through both loops
ch 2 (counts as 1st st + ch-1 – it may help to place a stitch marker in 2nd ch);
*(skip 1 st, hdc in next st, ch 1) around;
skip last st, join with sl st in 2nd ch.

Round 5: repeat Round 1.

Round 6: repeat Round 2.

Round 7: repeat Round 3.

Round 8 – bobbles, through both loops
ch 2, turn;

small bobble – worked 1 time, next to ch-2
[yarn over (yo), insert hook in base of ch-2, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through first 2 loops on hook] 2 times;
yo, pull through all 3 loops on hook;
ch 1, skip next st;

regular bobble – worked for remainder of round
[yarn over (yo), insert hook in st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through first 2 loops on hook] 3 times;
yo, pull through all 4 loops on hook;
ch 1, skip next st;

at end of round, join with sl st in top of first, small bobble.

Gauge

For the garment shown, the gauge for a 4.5″ square is 13 stitches of the 8 stitch sequences described above. However, gauge is less important than achieving the dimensions needed for the size desired.

Size

This garment is meant to be loose and drapey, so sizing is forgiving. The garment shown fits up to women’s size Large. The dimensions are as follows:

  • Cowl/hood opening – 28″ circumference (14″ per side when laid flat)
  • Cowl/hood length – 15″
  • Total length of garment, top to bottom – 28″

To ensure the scarf section will drape over the shoulders instead of just in the front, it’s important to measure it as shown below, excluding the point of the scarf. This measurement should be at least a couple inches larger than the measurement around the shoulders of the wearer.

To adjust the circumference of the cowl/hood, increase or decrease the length of your starting chain, keeping the total number of chains a multiple of 4.

To adjust the length of the cowl/hood, adjust the number of rounds worked before you begin the front increase in the scarf section.

To adjust the size of the scarf section, and whether or not it drapes over the shoulders or just drapes in front, adjust the number of rounds worked before you finish off.

Keep in mind that if you make this pattern larger than the garment shown, you may need additional yarn.

Directions

These directions will make the garment in the size shown above.

Cowl/hood section

Ch 80; join with sl st to form loop.
Note: The starting chain must be a multiple of 4.

Work Round 1 in the single bottom loop of each chain. This allows the double top loops to form a clean edge around the top edge of the cowl/hood. (80 st.)

Continuing with Round 2, repeat the sequence of Rounds 1-8 until 30 rounds are completed. The 30th round will be Round 6 in the sequence. (Each round = 80 st.)

Scarf section

The scarf flows directly from the cowl/hood. It is started by working a ch-2 space at the midpoint of the round, then working an increase of 4 stitches in the ch-2 space of all subsequent rounds.

Continuing the sequence with Round 7, work the first 40 st, ch 2, then work the remaining 40 st. (80 st + ch-2 space.)

Then continuing with Round 8, work 23 more rounds, with an increase of 4 stitches in each ch-2 space as described below:

  • For Rounds 1-7, work 2 hdc, ch 2, 2 hdc in the ch-2 space.
  • For Round 8 (bobble round), increases are worked as two bobbles in the ch-2 space:
    work first bobble, ch 3 (counts as ch 1 + ch-2 space); work second bobble, ch 1.
    Note: After working the two bobbles in the increase, don’t forget to skip the next stitch before working the next bobble on the side.

Tip: I find it helpful to place stitch markers in the last stitch before the ch-2 space and the first stitch after. For the bobble round, this means putting the first stitch marker in the first chain after the first bobble, and the second stitch marker in the second bobble.

The 23rd round will be Round 5 in the sequence. (168 st + ch-2 space.)

End with Round 6, working 5 hdc in the ch-2 space instead of the regular increase, to close the space. (173 st.)

Optional: Picots

Picots can be a nice way to add ornamentation to the bottom edge of this garment, but are entirely optional.

With right side facing, work a round of single crochet (sc) around the bottom edge. In each place a picot is desired, ch 2 then work sl st in the front loop of the sc just worked.

Note: You want your picots to be spaced out evenly from the front point of the bandana, so I recommend that before starting this round, count back from the point on each side and place stitch markers where picots are desired.

Finishing

Here’s how to work an invisible finish on the bottom edge with no detectable beginning or end.

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any items made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

I receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

In August 2017 I first saw Lion Brand Jeans yarn – new that year – and was immediately smitten. I bought skeins in five different colors: Faded, Classic, Vintage, Stonewash and Top Stitch.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

Lion Brand Jeans yarn in the color “Faded.”

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

Lion Brand Jeans yarn in the colors “Classic,” “Vintage,” “Stonewash” and “Top Stitch.”

Then I spent more than half a year trying to decide what to make with it. I knew I wanted to make a garment with sections of the blues and gray “stitched” together with the orange Top Stitch color, but I couldn’t make up my mind what pattern would show this to best advantage.

When spring (and poncho-wearing weather) was approaching, I finally decided what to do: I would keep it simple and adapt my own Easiest Poncho pattern.

The Easiest Poncho pattern was designed to be made using two Caron Cakes; alternating two “solid” rounds of double crochet, worked in back loop only to add texture, with three rounds of double crochet and chain-1 spaces, for a different, mesh texture.

To get the denim patchwork effect I wanted, I decided to keep the alternating solid and spaced bands, just making them wider and each in its own color.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

The only additions I made to the basic structure of the Easiest Poncho pattern is the orange “stitching” between color bands, the orange single crochet border around the neckline, and the orange single crochet border with picots around the hem.

The written pattern is below, with photos.  You may also find it helpful to watch the video tutorial for the Easiest Poncho pattern, which explains most of the basic concepts:

Pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

The poncho pictured here has a 22-inch neckline made with 80 single crochet, followed by 29 rounds of double crochet forming seven color bands, separated by six rounds of single crochet “stitching,” plus a single crochet border around both neckline and hem, for a total length of 31 inches from shoulder to point. Like the Easiest Poncho, you can easily adjust both the neckline and length if necessary.

In the pattern I give instructions for making a poncho identical to the one shown, but I encourage you to come up with your own color combinations. Besides the five colors I used, Lion Brand Jeans yarn comes in two additional colors – “Brand New” (very dark blue) and “Stovepipe” (black) – so have fun with all of them!

Materials you’ll need:

  • Lion Brand Jeans yarn in the following colors:
    • Classic – 2 skeins
    • Stonewash – 2 skeins
    • Faded – 1 skein
    • Vintage – 1 skein
    • Top Stitch – 1 skein
  • Size J crochet hook, or the size that works for your yarn
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle
  • Stitch markers are optional, but useful to mark your initial points, and if working picots in the border

Stitches used:

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)
  • Double crochet (dc)
  • Single crochet (sc), or optionally foundation single crochet (fsc) as an alternative way to make your initial ring

I prefer to start my projects with foundation single crochet whenever possible. Once you get the hang of it, it’s quite easy. If you’d like to learn how, watch the first part of my tutorial video:

Other techniques and notes

I used the invisible finish to finish off each of the blue and gray color bands neatly before working the orange “stitching” round. To learn this quick and easy technique, watch my tutorial video:

Like the Easiest Poncho, you will be working from the neck down.

Do NOT turn the work. This allows each color band to maintain a consistent texture.

The point where you start will be the back of the poncho. When changing colors, always start in the first appropriate stitch (as per the instructions) on the left side of the chain-2 space in the back point. This keeps all the joins neatly together in the back, where they are less visible, and keeps the stitches in the front of the poncho smooth and continuous.

Round 1: Form the neckline, using color “Stonewash” (medium blue)

Decide on the size of your neckline by measuring below the neck, near the collarbone. Keep in mind the neckline of the poncho may stretch slightly with wearing. The poncho shown has a 22-inch neckline.

The number of stitches in the neckline must be a multiple of 4. The neckline for the poncho shown has 80 stitches. Everyone’s gauge is different, so you may need to adjust this.

Form and join a loop of single crochet in the number of stitches you need, using whichever method you prefer: chaining + single crochet, or foundation single crochet.

If you use foundation single crochet, you will need to join your loop at the bottom of the stitch as well as at the top. Since the bottom of the foundation single crochet will be the top edge of your neckline, do this join at the bottom using the “invisible finish” and then weave in the end.

If you use chaining + single crochet, simply weave in the end.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

This illustration comes from the Easiest Poncho pattern – thus the different color.

Round 2: Form the points, continuing with color “Stonewash” (medium blue)

After you’ve formed your neckline, chain 3, which counts as your first double crochet. Locate the stitch immediately to the left of the chain 3, and then locate the stitch exactly opposite it. I find it helpful to mark this stitch with a stitch marker. These two stitches are where you’ll establish your points.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

This illustration comes from the Easiest Poncho pattern – thus the different color.

In the stitch immediately to the left of the chain 3, work 1 double crochet, chain 2, and then work one more double crochet. This is your first point.

Then double crochet in both loops of each single crochet until you reach the marked stitch opposite your first point. In this stitch you will again work 1 double crochet, chain 2, and then work one more double crochet. This is your second point.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

How the two points of the poncho are formed in round 2. (This illustration comes from the Easiest Poncho pattern – thus the different color.)

Continue working double crochet in each single crochet until you reach the chain 3. Join with a slip stitch in the back loop of the 3rd chain; weave in end.

After this step, you should check carefully that the number of double crochet on each side between the chain-2 spaces at each point is the same – and that it’s an odd number. In the second round of the poncho shown, there are 82 double crochet total – 41 on each side – plus two chain-2 spaces.

Round 3: Continuing with color “Stonewash” (medium blue)

Chain 3, which counts as a double crochet, and then work a double crochet in the back loop of each stitch. In the chain-2 space at each of the two points, work an increase by working 2 double crochet, chaining 2, then working 2 more double crochet. You will work all increases this way for the remainder of the pattern.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

This is how all increases are worked from round 3 onward. (This illustration comes from the Easiest Poncho pattern – thus the different color.)

When you reach the chain 3 at the beginning of this round, join to the 3rd chain using the “invisible finish” and weave in your end. 90 double crochet and two chain-2 spaces.

Round 4 – Color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Note: All rounds of orange “stitching” are worked as described here. You will not be working increases at the points; instead, you will work a slip stitch in each of the two chain stitches at each point. All single crochet on the sides will be worked through both loops.

Using a slip stitch, connect yarn to the left chain stitch in the chain-2 space of the back point, and then work a single crochet in the top of each double crochet around. At the front point, work a slip stitch in each of the two chain stitches, then continue working single crochet in each double crochet. When you return to the back point, finish with a slip stitch in the right chain stitch of the chain-2 space, and cut the yarn leaving a six-inch tail. 90 single crochet and 4 slip stitches.

Your beginning and ending yarn tails will now be next to each other in the back point. Because the orange slip stitches at each point will be completely covered when you work the increases in the next round, feel free to knot your orange yarn tails at the back point. I use a square knot, which is easy and very secure, then weave in the yarn tails under the orange stitches.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

Notice how the gray (“Vintage”) yarn completely covers the orange (“Top Stitch”) yarn at the point. There’s an orange knot lurking underneath there, but you’ll never see it.

Rounds 5-8: Four “spaced” rounds, using color “Vintage” (gray)

Note: All bands of “spaced” rounds are worked as described here. All double crochet on the sides will be worked through both loops.

Using a slip stitch, connect yarn to the 2nd single crochet stitch to the left of the back point. Chain 4, which counts as a double crochet plus a chain-1 space. Skip the next stitch, and in the following stitch work a double crochet and then chain 1. Continue in this manner along both sides. In the chain-2 space at each of the two points, work an increase as described above, then chain 1 and skip a stitch before starting the next side. When you reach the chain 4 at the beginning, after the increase/chain-1, join with a slip stitch in the 3rd (not last) chain.

When you have completed four “spaced” rounds, join to the 3rd chain using the “invisible finish” and weave in your end. Round 8 will have 122 stitches and two chain-2 spaces (each round increases by 8 stitches).

Round 9: Color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Work as described for round 4, working single crochet both in the double crochet and in the chain stitches. (I prefer to work in the chain stitches and not through the chain-1 spaces because I think it looks neater, but feel free to do whichever you prefer.) Round 9 will have 122 single crochet and 4 slip stitches.

Rounds 10-14: Five “solid” rounds, using color “Classic” (dark blue)

Note: All bands of “solid” rounds are worked as described here. All double crochet on the sides will be worked through back loops only.

Using a slip stitch, connect yarn to the 1st single crochet stitch to the left of the back point. Chain 3, which counts as a double crochet, then work a double crochet in each stitch along both sides. In the chain-2 space at each of the two points, work an increase as described above. When you reach the chain 3 at the beginning, join with a slip stitch in the back loop of the 3rd chain.

When you have completed five “solid” rounds, join to the 3rd chain using the “invisible finish” and weave in your end. Round 14 will have 162 double crochet and two chain-2 spaces (again, each round increases by 8 stitches).

Round 15: Color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Work as described for round 4. 162 single crochet and four slip stitches.

Rounds 16-19: Four “spaced” rounds, using color “Faded” (light blue)

Work as described for rounds 5-8. Round 19 will have 194 stitches and two chain-2 spaces.

Round 20: Color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Work as described for round 4. 194 single crochet and four slip stitches.

Rounds 21-25: Five “solid” rounds, using color “Stonewash” (medium blue)

Work as described for rounds 10-14. Round 25 will have 234 double crochet and two chain-2 spaces.

Round 26: Color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Work as described for round 4. 234 single crochet and four slip stitches.

Rounds 27-30: Four “spaced” rounds, using color “Vintage” (gray)

Work as described for rounds 5-8. Round 30 will have 266 stitches and two chain-2 spaces.

Round 31: Color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Work as described for round 4. 266 single crochet and four slip stitches.

Rounds 32-36: Five “solid” rounds, using color “Classic” (dark blue)

Work as described for rounds 10-14. Round 36 will have 306 double crochet and two chain-2 spaces.

Border at neckline, using color “Top Stitch” (orange)

Using a slip stitch, connect Top Stitch color yarn to the 1st stitch to the left of the back point; chain 1 (counts as first single crochet); work a single crochet in each stitch around; join to the first single crochet (not the chain-1) using the “invisible finish” and weave in your end.

Border at hem, using color “Top Stitch” (orange)

For a plain border, without optional picots

Using a slip stitch, connect Top Stitch color yarn to the 3rd stitch to the left of the back point; chain 1 (counts as first single crochet); work a single crochet in each stitch around and five single crochet in each chain-2 space; join to the first single crochet (not the chain-1) using the “invisible finish” and weave in your end.

To add optional picots

In the poncho shown, I worked picots at every 5th stitch of the border, skipping the points, which produced 30 picots spaced evenly along each side.

To insure that your picots are evenly spaced, you may want to lay your poncho out flat and mark the picot locations with stitch markers, safety pins or bobby pins, before you work the hem border.

To form a picot, chain 3.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

Insert hook through top front loop of single crochet.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

Yarn over and pull through both loops. The next single crochet worked will anchor the left side of the picot.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any ponchos made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: Denim patchwork poncho

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

I receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

Check out the “super-sized” version of this pattern that’s large enough to cover the head and shoulders: The “big hug” hooded cowl scarf.

I’ve recently posted patterns for a triangle shawl scarf in both a lightweight version and a heavier version, but I’ll let you in on a secret: while I absolutely love the look, I realized I don’t like to wear them myself, because I feel like they need to be adjusted all the time. I just don’t like accessories I have to fuss with – I want to be able to put them on and then forget about them while I go about my day.

That’s why I got excited the first time I saw a photo of a bandana cowl. That was the triangle scarf for me! However, the one pictured was done in a chunky granny stitch. It was lovely, but I wanted something different.

I looked at some patterns, but everything I saw either involved making the cowl and bandana separately and then stitching them together, or else the triangle was only in the front, and thus too narrow for my taste. Having just designed a poncho pattern that was crocheted top-down from the neckline, I didn’t see why the same thing couldn’t be done for a bandana cowl.

After a couple of false starts and some frogging, I figured out how to make exactly what I wanted. My version is worked in one piece, in the round, from the top of the cowl down to the bottom edge of the bandana. Like all my patterns so far, it uses only the most elementary of crochet stitches.

The cowl is basically a tube with a diameter slightly smaller than your head, so that it goes over your head with gentle stretching, and a length that allows it to drape around your neck in graceful folds.

Transitioning from the cowl portion to the bandana portion couldn’t be easier. Once you’ve completed the cowl, you simply continue working in the round, but add an increase at the midway point of each round – what will be the center front of your bandana cowl. This forms the point, and allows the front to widen into a triangle.

I provide instructions below to make this in both #4 and #5 weight yarns. For the #4 weight bandana cowl shown below, I used Caron Simply Soft Tweeds yarn in Off White.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

For the #5 weight bandana cowl shown below, I used Lion Brand Scarfie yarn in Oxford/Claret. It turned out wonderfully soft and warm.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

About the stitch

For both these bandana cowls, I opted not to use a pattern stitch but instead stuck with plain half-double crochet, which creates a subtle ribbed texture that showcases the unique colors and textures of each of these yarns. They also worked up super fast – I made both, start to finish, on the same day. However, the simplicity of the piece lends itself to experimenting with pattern stitches and colors, so play with it! Have fun! Personally, I plan to use up some of the remnants of my various Caron Cakes to make one in colorful stripes, and maybe throw in some bobbles.

About sizing

The patterns given here should fit most adults and older teens. If you need to adjust the size up or down, simply increase or decrease the number of stitches in increments of two, taking care to always start with an even number of stitches, counting the turning chain. If you wish to adjust the number of rows, to maintain the proportions I recommend adding or subtracting rows in twos, with one row being in the cowl portion and one in the bandana portion.

Yarns and individual tensions vary and the sizing does not need to be absolutely precise, but if you find the size you’re getting is very different from the finished sizes listed below for each pattern, try using a different size hook.

Also, remember that the cowl should go over the head with only gentle stretching, so if possible have the intended wearer try it on after you’ve completed the first few rounds to make sure it’s neither too loose nor too tight. This is especially important if you’re changing the number of stitches, for example, to make a child’s size.

Important notes

This garment is worked all in one piece, from the top of the cowl down to the bottom of the bandana.

Always start with an even number of stitches.

The turning chain always counts as one stitch in the round.

The increase at the point of the bandana portion is worked exactly opposite the turning chain in the loop. This puts the turning chain in the center back, where it’s least noticeable.

Pattern 1: Two-in-one bandana cowl, #4 weight yarn

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowlMaterials you’ll need:

  • 1 skein Caron Simply Soft Tweeds yarn, or 200 yards of a #4 weight yarn of your choice
  • Size I crochet hook (or the size that works with your yarn)
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle
  • Stitch markers (optional; useful if working picots in border)

Stitches used:

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)
  • Double crochet (dc)
  • Single crochet (sc), or optionally foundation single crochet (fsc) as an alternative way to make your initial loop

Finished size:

The cowl portion should be close to 18″ in diameter and 6″ tall. The diameter of the bottom of the bandana should be about 34″, and the height of the overall piece should be about 11.5″, excluding picot border.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

Round 1: Form a loop of 50 sc. You can do this in one of two ways:

  • Chaining/single crochet:
    Ch 50 and join with sl st to form loop (taking care not to twist the chain);
    ch 1, starting in next st work 49 sc, join with sl st in ch 1.
  • Foundation single crochet:
    Work 49 fsc, join with sl st in top of starting ch 2.

Note: Either method is fine for this project, but I personally prefer starting projects with foundation stitches whenever possible. If you’d like to learn how to do foundation stitches (it’s surprisingly easy), see my brief video tutorial.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

This is a starting loop of foundation single crochet. Once completed, it’s indistinguishable from a loop made by chaining and then working single crochet, but I find it quicker and easier.

Rounds 2-12 (cowl): ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in each st around, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (50 st).

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

This is the completed cowl portion. For both this pattern and the one below for #5 weight yarn, the cowl should be close to 6″ tall and 18″ in diameter.

Round 13 (transition to bandana): ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in next 24 st, (1 hdc, ch2, 1 hdc) in 25th st, work 1 hdc in next 24 st, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (51 st and 1 ch2 space).

Note: This is the only round in which the increase is (1 hdc, ch2, 1 hdc).

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

After round 13 is complete. Note the (1 hdc, ch2, 1 hdc) increase in the center front.

Round 14: ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in next 25 st, (2 hdc, ch2, 2 hdc) in ch2 space, work 1 hdc in next 25 st, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (55 st and 1 ch2 space).

Note: In this and all following rounds, the increase is (2 hdc, ch2, 2 hdc).

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

After round 14. From this tiny kernel, the bandana portion will grow wider with each successive row, until it encompasses the entire front of the piece.

Rounds 15-25: Continue as for round 14, always working (2 hdc, ch2, 2 hdc) in the ch2 space. Note that the number of stitches in each round increases by 4 – 2 on each side of the point – so that in round 25 you will work 47 stitches on each side, for a total of 99 stitches when you count the increase and the turning chain.

Optional round 26 (sc border with picots): ch 1 and, without turning the work, work sc in each st around, with 3 sc in the ch2 space at the point; at each st where a picot is desired, sc, ch3 and then sl st in top front loop of same sc to form a picot, then continue with sc in next st.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

At each stitch where a picot is desired, work a single crochet and then chain 3…

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

…then complete the picot by working a slip stitch in the top front loop of that same single crochet.

Note: You want your picots to be spaced out evenly from the front point of the bandana, so I recommend that before starting this round, you count back from the point on each side and mark where to place the picots.

Stitch markers are very useful for marking picots; you can also use bobby pins or safety pins.

Finishing:

For this piece, I opted to go back and work a border of sc around the top of the cowl to neaten it up. Like the picot border, this is entirely optional.

When completing the last round, and if adding a border to the top of the cowl, instead of joining to the turning chain in the regular way (which leaves an awkward knot), use the “invisible finish.” Here’s my quick tutorial video:

Weave in all ends.

Pattern 2: Two-in-one bandana cowl, #5 weight yarn

The basic concepts of this pattern are identical to those of the pattern above, except that you’re using a thicker yarn and a correspondingly larger hook. You still work the same number of rounds, but need fewer stitches in each round. Because of the heavier yarn and slightly chunkier look, I opted not to add any borders to this piece.

Note: Because this pattern is a variation of pattern 1, you can refer back to pattern 1 for most photo illustrations.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowlMaterials you’ll need:

  • 1 skein Lion Brand Scarfie yarn, or 200 yards of a #5 weight yarn of your choice
    Note: If using Scarfie, you should have about 2 oz left over from the skein – enough to make a matching beanie!
  • Size K crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle

Stitches used:

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)
  • Half-double crochet (hdc)
  • Optionally, foundation half-double crochet (fhdc) as an alternative way to make your initial loop

Finished size:

Because #5 weight yarn is a little thicker, the overall size will be a little bigger. The cowl portion should still be close to 18″ in diameter and 6″ tall, but the diameter of the bottom of the bandana should be about 38″, and the height of the whole piece should be about 12″.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

Round 1: Form a loop of 46 hdc. You can do this in one of two ways:

  • Chaining/single crochet:
    Ch 46 and join with sl st to form loop (taking care not to twist the chain);
    ch 2, starting in next st work 45 hdc, join with sl st in top of ch 2.
  • Foundation half-double crochet:
    Work 45 fhdc, join with sl st in top of starting ch 2.

Rounds 2-12 (cowl): ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in each st around, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (46 st).

Round 13 (transition to bandana): ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in next 22 st, (1 hdc, ch2, 1 hdc) in 23rd st, work 1 hdc in next 22 st, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (47 st and 1 ch2 space).

Note: This is the only round in which the increase is 1 hdc, ch2, 1 hdc.

Round 14: ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in next 23 st, (2 hdc, ch2, 2 hdc) in ch2 space, work 1 hdc in next 23 st, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (51 st and 1 ch2 space).

Note: In this and all following rounds, the increase is 2 hdc, ch2, 2 hdc.

Rounds 15-24: Continue as for round 14, always working (2 hdc, ch2, 2 hdc) in the ch2 space. Note that the number of stitches in each round increases by 4 – 2 on each side of the point – so that in round 24 you will work 43 stitches on each side, for a total of 91 stitches when you count the increase and the turning chain.

Round 25: ch2 and turn, work 1 hdc in next 45 st, work 5 hdc in ch2 space (thereby closing up ch2 space), work 1 hdc in next 45 st, join with sl st top top of ch 2 (96 st).

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

Because I didn’t add a border to this version, on the 25th and final row I worked 5 half-double crochet in the chain 2 space, to close it up for a more finished look.

Finishing:

Weave in ends.

If you use either of these patterns…

I would love to see any bandana cowls made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: Two-in-one bandana cowl

Free crochet pattern: One “mandala” cake triangle scarf

I receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

This pattern was updated on 12/11/17 and 7/30/19.

I got my first Lion Brand Mandala cakes, in the colorway “Gnome,” some time last summer, but they sat in my yarn stash for a while before I got the idea to try them with my pattern for the one “big cake” triangle shawl scarf.

Free crochet pattern: One

Instead of the size K hook I used with the Caron Big Cake, I used a size H hook with the Mandala cake (the size recommended on the label) and it worked beautifully.

As it turns out, I only needed a single Mandala cake to crochet a triangle scarf that is more lightweight, but otherwise comparable to its chunkier cousin made with a Caron Big Cake.

In fact, I think I prefer the lightweight Mandala version of this scarf. It will definitely be wearable well into the spring, when heavier pieces have been packed away.

Free crochet pattern: One

To make the scarf pictured, I crocheted 38 rows, then added a simple single crochet border, to make a triangle that’s 58″ along the long side, 38″ on each short side, and 27″ tall. In other words, to get the same size triangle as with the Caron Big Cake, I needed to crochet 4 more rows with the Mandala cake. I also had less yarn left over – just half an ounce.

The pattern itself is identical to the big cake version, using the most elementary of crochet stitches; the only changes are the yarn and the hook size. For convenience, I’m reprinting the written pattern below (refer to the big cake pattern for photos), and also including the video tutorial made for the big cake version:

Pattern: One “mandala” cake triangle scarf

Materials you’ll need:

1 Lion Brand Mandala cake, or 590 yards of a #3 weight yarn of your choice
Size H crochet hook, or the size that works for your yarn
Scissors
Measuring tape
Yarn needle
Stitch markers (optional; only used if working picots in border)

Stitches used:

Chain stitch (ch)
Slip stitch (sl st)
Single crochet (sc)
Double crochet (dc)

Row 1 (“foundation” row):

Ch 4. Skip 3 ch (counts as 1st dc), (2 dc, ch2, 3 dc) in 4th ch from hook.
(6 dc and 1 ch 2 space)

Because this is a one-cake project, there should only be two ends to weave in: one after completing round 1, and the other after completing the border. Using a yarn needle, weave in the first end now.

Row 2 (“solid” row):

Note: This row is repeated for all even-numbered rows that follow.

Ch 3 and turn (counts as first dc); dc in same stitch.

(From row 2 onward, always work first dc in same stitch as turning chain.)

Dc in each stitch up to ch 2 space at point; (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in ch 2 space; dc in each stitch up to end of row; 2 dc in last stitch.
(12 dc and 1 ch 2 space)

Row 3 (“spaced” row):

Note: This row is repeated for all odd-numbered rows that follow.

Ch 4 and turn (counts as first dc and ch 1); dc in same stitch; repeat (ch 1, skip 1 stitch, 1 dc in next stitch) up to ch 2 space at point, ending with a ch 1*; (1 dc, ch 2, 1 dc) in ch 2 space; repeat (ch 1, skip 1 stitch, 1 dc in next stitch) up to end of row, ending with a ch 1*; (1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in last stitch.
(10 dc and 8 ch 1 spaces on sides, or 18 stitches total; 1 ch 2 space at point)
* Update on 12/11/17: “ending with a ch 1” added for clarification. In the “spaced” row there is a ch 1 between every dc, but as originally written this was not made explicitly clear. Apologies for any confusion.

Rows 4+:

Repeat rows 2 and 3 (“solid” and “spaced” rows) until desired size is reached, ending on an even-numbered (“solid”) row. For each row, the number of stitches increases by 6.

When working a solid row on top of a spaced row, you will work the dc stitches through the ch 1 spaces of the row below, as well as in the top of the dc stitches.

Note: You are basically creating a right triangle with increases worked only at the three angles. Be aware that while a mistake made on one of the sides is easy to recover from in the next row, a mistake made when increasing at the angles could skew your work. Just be mindful at the beginning and end of each row, and when working the ch 2 space at the point of the triangle, and your triangle will be nice and even.

Stitch count by row

Added 7/30/19

In response to several requests, here are the number of stitches in each row (NOT counting the chain-2 space at the point which remains consistent). Note that the total stitch count increases by 6 for each successive row. If you find your triangle is not even, checking your stitch count against the counts below should help locate where you may have gone off track.

Row 1 (solid): 3 dc on each side = 6 st total
Row 2 (solid): 6 dc on each side = 12 dc total
Row 3 (spaced): 5 dc & 4 ch-1 spaces on each side = 18 st total
Row 4 (solid): 12 dc on each side = 24 st total
Row 5 (spaced): 8 dc & 7 ch-1 spaces on each side = 30 st total
Row 6 (solid): 18 dc on each side = 36 st total
Row 7 (spaced): 11 dc & 10 ch-1 spaces on each side = 42 st total
Row 8 (solid): 24 dc on each side = 48 st total
Row 9 (spaced): 14 dc & 13 ch-1 spaces on each side = 54 st total
Row 10 (solid): 30 dc on each side = 60 st total
Row 11 (spaced): 17 dc & 16 ch-1 spaces on each side = 66 st total
Row 12 (solid): 36 dc on each side = 72 st total
Row 13 (spaced): 20 dc & 19 ch-1 spaces on each side = 78 st total
Row 14 (solid): 42 dc on each side = 84 st total
Row 15 (spaced): 23 dc & 22 ch-1 spaces on each side = 90 st total
Row 16 (solid): 48 dc on each side = 96 st total
Row 17 (spaced): 26 dc & 25 ch-1 spaces on each side = 102 st total
Row 18 (solid): 54 dc on each side = 108 st total
Row 19 (spaced): 29 dc & 28 ch-1 spaces on each side = 114 st total
Row 20 (solid): 60 dc on each side = 120 st total
Row 21 (spaced): 32 dc & 31 ch-1 spaces on each side = 126 st total
Row 22 (solid): 66 dc on each side = 132 st total
Row 23 (spaced): 35 dc & 34 ch-1 spaces on each side = 138 st total
Row 24 (solid): 72 dc on each side = 144 st total
Row 25 (spaced): 38 dc & 37 ch-1 spaces on each side = 150 st total
Row 26 (solid): 78 dc on each side = 156 st total
Row 27 (spaced): 41 dc & 40 ch-1 spaces on each side = 162 st total
Row 28 (solid): 84 dc on each side = 168 st total
Row 29 (spaced): 44 dc & 43 ch-1 spaces on each side = 174 st total
Row 30 (solid): 90 dc on each side = 180 st total
Row 31 (spaced): 47 dc & 46 ch-1 spaces on each side = 186 st total
Row 32 (solid): 96 dc on each side = 192 st total
Row 33 (spaced): 50 dc & 49 ch-1 spaces on each side = 198 st total
Row 34 (solid): 102 dc on each side = 204 st total
Row 35 (spaced): 53 dc & 52 ch-1 spaces on each side = 210 st total
Row 36 (solid): 108 dc on each side = 216 st total
Row 37 (spaced): 56 dc & 55 ch-1 spaces on each side = 222 st total
Row 38 (solid): 114 dc on each side = 228 st total

Plain border:

After completing final, “solid” row,  ch 1 (do not turn); working along the long side of triangle, 3 sc along each dc; at end of long side, work 1 extra sc; sc in each stitch on first short side; 3 sc in ch 2 space at point of triangle; sc in each stitch on second short side; sl st in starting ch 1; finish off and weave in end.

Note: I opted to work the plain border twice along the long side and only once along each short side. Since the border color (in this case, purple) matched the color of the last row of the short sides, but was different from most of the colors in the long side, it simply looked better to me to make it thicker on the long side. Do whatever looks good to you!

Optional picots:

If you plan to include picots, it’s helpful to use stitch markers to indicate where you want them before you start your border. That way you can insure they’re evenly spaced without having to count stitches while you work.

To work a picot: Sc in stitch where picot is desired; ch 2; sl st in top of same sc.

Continue sc border to next picot location.

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any scarves made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: One

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you’ll ever make

I receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

To purchase a printable, ad-free version of this pattern with expanded instructions for just $3, visit ravelry.com/patterns/library/the-easiest-poncho-youll-ever-make.

See also my free Denim Patchwork Poncho pattern, adapted from this pattern.

This lightweight poncho has a streamlined silhouette and a lovely subtle texture. And, you can crochet it quickly and easily from just two Caron Cakes using only elementary crochet stitches!

The color used here is Turkish Delight, which is one of my favorite cake colors. I think it goes exceptionally well with denim.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Turkish Delight is a new Caron Cake colorway for fall 2017.

You crochet this poncho from the neck down, working in the round. To start, you make a loop of single crochet for the neckline. In the second round you switch to double crochet and create two points exactly opposite each other. Then you continue adding rounds, alternating two rounds of solid double crochet worked in back loop only, with three rounds of double crochet and chain-1 spaces, and always increasing at the points.

When making the loop for the neckline, instead of the traditional two-step process of chaining and then working the single crochet, I prefer to use foundation single crochet, which is done in a single step. Foundation stitches are especially useful when you need to crochet your foundation row to a specific length, as with the neckline of this poncho, and I use them whenever possible.

Feel free to use whatever method is most comfortable to you for the neckline, but if you’re interested in learning more about foundation stitches, you can watch my quick tutorial video:

Here is the video tutorial for this poncho pattern. The written pattern follows below it.

Pattern: The easiest poncho you’ll ever make

The poncho pictured here has a 26-inch neckline made with 88 single crochet, followed by 32 rounds of double crochet, for a total length of 35 inches from shoulder to point. This size will fit many people, but you can easily adjust both the neckline and length if necessary.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

I had just 1 ounce of yarn left over from 2 cakes, so if you want to make your poncho bigger you should get more yarn.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

This is how much yarn I had left from 2 cakes – precisely 1 ounce.

Materials you’ll need:

  • 2 Caron Cakes, or 760 yards of a medium weight (#4) yarn of your choice
  • Size I crochet hook, or the size that works for your yarn
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle
  • Stitch markers are optional, but useful to mark your initial points

Stitches used:

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)
  • Double crochet (dc)
  • Single crochet (sc), or optionally foundation single crochet (fsc) as an alternative way to make your initial ring

Important note:

Do not turn the work. This allows the colors to spiral gracefully from the neckline to the hem.

Step 1: Form the neckline

Decide on the size of your neckline by measuring below the neck, near the collarbone. Keep in mind the neckline of the poncho may stretch slightly with wearing.

For my poncho, I made a 26-inch neckline, a size that goes over my head easily without catching earrings, but doesn’t risk falling off my shoulders.

The number of stitches in the neckline must be a multiple of 4. The neckline for this poncho is 88 stitches. Everyone’s gauge is different, so you may need to adjust this.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Form and join a loop of single crochet in the number of stitches you need, using whichever method you prefer: chaining + single crochet, or foundation single crochet.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Step 2: Form the points

After you’ve formed your neckline, chain 3, which counts as your first double crochet. Locate the stitch immediately to the left of the chain 3, and then locate the stitch exactly opposite it. I find it helpful to mark this stitch with a stitch marker. These two stitches are where you’ll establish your points.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

In the stitch immediately to the left of the chain 3, work 1 double crochet, chain 2, and then work one more double crochet. This is your first point.

Then double crochet in both loops of each single crochet until you reach the marked stitch opposite your first point. In this stitch you will again work 1 double crochet, chain 2, and then work one more double crochet. This is your second point.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

How the two points of the poncho are formed in round 2.

Continue working double crochet in each single crochet until you reach the chain 3. Join with a slip stitch in the 3rd chain.

After this step, you should check carefully that the number of double crochet on each side between the chain-2 spaces at each point is the same – and that it’s an odd number. In the second round of this poncho, there are 90 double crochet total – 45 on each side.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Once you’ve formed your neckline and established your two points, you begin working the pattern by alternating two rounds of solid double crochet worked in back loop only, with three rounds of double crochet and chain-1 spaces, and always increasing at the points.

No border is needed – just take care to end with two solid rounds.

Increasing at point – all rounds from here throughout

In the chain-2 space at each point, work 2 double crochet, chain 2, then work 2 more double crochet.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

How all points are worked from round 3 onward.

Solid rounds

Chain 3, which counts as a double crochet, and then work a double crochet in the back loop of each stitch. In the chain-2 space at each of the two points, work an increase as described above. When you reach the chain 3, join with a slip stitch in the 3rd chain.

Note: Round 2, the first round worked in double crochet in which the points were established, counts as the first of two solid rounds.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Spaced rounds

Chain 4, which counts as a double crochet plus a chain-1 space. Skip the next stitch, and in the following stitch work a double crochet and then chain 1. Continue in this manner along both sides. In the chain-2 space at each of the two points, work an increase as described above. When you reach the chain 4, join with a slip stitch in the 3rd (not last) chain.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Last round

When you finish the last round, instead of joining to the turning chain in the regular way (which leaves an awkward knot), use the “invisible finish.” Here’s my quick tutorial video:

Weave in your ends, and you’re done. That’s all there is to it!

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any ponchos made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: The easiest poncho you'll ever make

Free crochet pattern: One “big cake” shawl scarf

I receive commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

This pattern was updated on 12/11/17 and 7/30/19.

To purchase a printable, ad-free version of this pattern with all updates included for just $3, visit https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/one-big-cake-shawl-scarf.

This project requires very little effort for very gratifying results. Using only a single Caron Big Cake and the most elementary of crochet stitches, you can quickly make this versatile, one-size-fits-most piece that can be worn as either a shawl or a scarf.

Caron Big Cakes are new this fall and this is the first time I’ve worked with them. One thing I noticed was that while the label calls for a size H hook, I found that too small for this pattern because the resulting fabric was stiff. So, I tested progressively larger hooks until I reached size K, which produced a fabric with the right “feel.” Everyone’s tension is different, so don’t be afraid to try a different hook to get the feel you want. This shawl scarf is meant to be cozy as well as easy and colorful.

To make the shawl scarf pictured, I used one Caron Big Cake in the color “Toffee Brickle” and crocheted 34 rows, plus the border; I had 1-1/8 ounces of yarn left over. The resulting triangle measures 58″ along the long side, 39″ on each short side, and 27″ tall.

This can easily be sized smaller for a child – just work fewer rows!

If you plan to make an adult size and use up most of the cake, you should stop adding rows when you have at least 3/4 of an ounce of yarn left, so that you have enough to make the border.

Here are two versions of a video tutorial showing the basic steps. The first, original video is 6 minutes long. In response to the feedback it received, I’ve added a slower version of the same tutorial that is 8:20 long. The written pattern follows below the two videos.

Pattern: One “big cake” shawl scarf

Materials you’ll need:

1 Caron Big Cake, or 600 yards of a medium weight (#4) yarn of your choice
Size K crochet hook, or the size that works for your yarn
Scissors
Measuring tape
Yarn needle
Stitch markers (optional; only used if working picots in border)

Stitches used:

Chain stitch (ch)
Slip stitch (sl st)
Single crochet (sc)
Double crochet (dc)

Row 1 (“foundation” row):

Ch 4. Skip 3 ch (counts as 1st dc), (2 dc, ch2, 3 dc) in 4th ch from hook.
(6 dc and 1 ch 2 space)

Free crochet pattern: One

Free crochet pattern: One

Because this is a one-cake project, there should only be two ends to weave in: one after completing round 1, and the other after completing the border. Using a yarn needle, weave in the first end now:

Free crochet pattern: One

Row 2 (“solid” row):

Note: This row is repeated for all even-numbered rows that follow.

Ch 3 and turn (counts as first dc); dc in same stitch:

Free crochet pattern: One

From row 2 onward, always work first dc in same stitch as turning chain.

Dc in each stitch up to ch 2 space at point; (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in ch 2 space; dc in each stitch up to end of row; 2 dc in last stitch.
(12 dc and 1 ch 2 space)

Free crochet pattern: One

After row 2.

Row 3 (“spaced” row):

Note: This row is repeated for all odd-numbered rows that follow.

Ch 4 and turn (counts as first dc and ch 1); dc in same stitch; repeat (ch 1, skip 1 stitch, 1 dc in next stitch) up to ch 2 space at point, ending with a ch 1*; (1 dc, ch 2, 1 dc) in ch 2 space; repeat (ch 1, skip 1 stitch, 1 dc in next stitch) up to end of row, ending with a ch 1*; (1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in last stitch.
(10 dc and 8 ch 1 spaces on sides, or 18 stitches total; 1 ch 2 space at point)
* Update on 12/11/17: “ending with a ch 1” added for clarification. In the “spaced” row there is a ch 1 between every dc (as shown in the photo below), but as originally written this was not made explicitly clear. Apologies for any confusion.

Free crochet pattern: One

After row 3.

Rows 4+:

Repeat rows 2 and 3 (“solid” and “spaced” rows) until desired size is reached, ending on an even-numbered (“solid”) row. For each row, the number of stitches increases by 6.

When working a solid row on top of a spaced row, you will work the dc stitches through the ch 1 spaces of the row below, as well as in the top of the dc stitches.

Note: You are basically creating a right triangle with increases worked only at the three angles. Be aware that while a mistake made on one of the sides is easy to recover from in the next row, a mistake made when increasing at the angles could skew your work. Just be mindful at the beginning and end of each row, and when working the ch 2 space at the point of the triangle, and your triangle will be nice and even.

Free crochet pattern: One

After row 6.

Stitch count by row

Added 7/30/19

In response to several requests, here are the number of stitches in each row (NOT counting the chain-2 space at the point which remains consistent). Note that the total stitch count increases by 6 for each successive row. If you find your triangle is not even, checking your stitch count against the counts below should help locate where you may have gone off track.

Row 1 (solid): 3 dc on each side = 6 st total
Row 2 (solid): 6 dc on each side = 12 dc total
Row 3 (spaced): 5 dc & 4 ch-1 spaces on each side = 18 st total
Row 4 (solid): 12 dc on each side = 24 st total
Row 5 (spaced): 8 dc & 7 ch-1 spaces on each side = 30 st total
Row 6 (solid): 18 dc on each side = 36 st total
Row 7 (spaced): 11 dc & 10 ch-1 spaces on each side = 42 st total
Row 8 (solid): 24 dc on each side = 48 st total
Row 9 (spaced): 14 dc & 13 ch-1 spaces on each side = 54 st total
Row 10 (solid): 30 dc on each side = 60 st total
Row 11 (spaced): 17 dc & 16 ch-1 spaces on each side = 66 st total
Row 12 (solid): 36 dc on each side = 72 st total
Row 13 (spaced): 20 dc & 19 ch-1 spaces on each side = 78 st total
Row 14 (solid): 42 dc on each side = 84 st total
Row 15 (spaced): 23 dc & 22 ch-1 spaces on each side = 90 st total
Row 16 (solid): 48 dc on each side = 96 st total
Row 17 (spaced): 26 dc & 25 ch-1 spaces on each side = 102 st total
Row 18 (solid): 54 dc on each side = 108 st total
Row 19 (spaced): 29 dc & 28 ch-1 spaces on each side = 114 st total
Row 20 (solid): 60 dc on each side = 120 st total
Row 21 (spaced): 32 dc & 31 ch-1 spaces on each side = 126 st total
Row 22 (solid): 66 dc on each side = 132 st total
Row 23 (spaced): 35 dc & 34 ch-1 spaces on each side = 138 st total
Row 24 (solid): 72 dc on each side = 144 st total
Row 25 (spaced): 38 dc & 37 ch-1 spaces on each side = 150 st total
Row 26 (solid): 78 dc on each side = 156 st total
Row 27 (spaced): 41 dc & 40 ch-1 spaces on each side = 162 st total
Row 28 (solid): 84 dc on each side = 168 st total
Row 29 (spaced): 44 dc & 43 ch-1 spaces on each side = 174 st total
Row 30 (solid): 90 dc on each side = 180 st total
Row 31 (spaced): 47 dc & 46 ch-1 spaces on each side = 186 st total
Row 32 (solid): 96 dc on each side = 192 st total
Row 33 (spaced): 50 dc & 49 ch-1 spaces on each side = 198 st total
Row 34 (solid): 102 dc on each side = 204 st total

Plain border:

After completing final, “solid” row,  ch 1 (do not turn); working along the long side of triangle, 3 sc along each dc; at end of long side, work 1 extra sc; sc in each stitch on first short side; 3 sc in ch 2 space at point of triangle; sc in each stitch on second short side; sl st in starting ch 1; finish off and weave in end.

Optional picots:

Some shawl scarf patterns call for a tassel at each of the three corners, and you can certainly do that with this pattern. Personally, I don’t care for tassels (nor fringe or pom poms, for that matter) so instead I worked easy picots approximately every 3 inches in the border for a non-obtrusive bit of decoration.

If you plan to include picots, it’s helpful to use stitch markers to indicate where you want them before you start your border. That way you can insure they’re evenly spaced without having to count stitches while you work.

Free crochet pattern: One

Note purple stitch marker where picot is to go.

To work a picot: Sc in stitch where picot is desired; ch 2:

Free crochet pattern: One

Sl st in top of same sc:

Free crochet pattern: One

Free crochet pattern: One

Free crochet pattern: One

Continue sc border to next picot location.

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any shawl scarves made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: One

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

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I developed my original pattern for the granny square cocoon cardigan using a solid color heather yarn, Lion Brand Heartland. Then I decided to see what would happen when I made the same pattern using self-striping yarn. I wanted to make a birthday present for a dear friend and chose a Caron Cake yarn with five colors in approximately equal amounts – three blues and two grays. My intent was for the colors to fan out from the center of the back in roughly concentric squares, like this:

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

And come together in interesting angles on the front, like this:

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

My original pattern is based on turning the work at the beginning of each round, resulting in a granny square with no wrong side (or two right sides, however you want to look at it). For a solid-color yarn, that’s great. But when I did the same thing with the self-striping yarn, it wasn’t long before I realized I was not getting concentric squares. Instead, the colors doubled back on themselves each time I changed direction at the beginning of a new round. As the square got bigger, the colors began “bunching up” on one side or the other.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that – it’s an interesting effect – but I had my heart set on those concentric squares, and I had no desire to “slice and dice” the yarn to get them. (All those extra ends to weave in – not fun!)

I realized that to achieve what I wanted, I needed to adjust the pattern so I never turned the work, but always kept the yarn moving in the same direction. That way, the colors wouldn’t double back on themselves each time I began a new round.

A demonstration

I created the two diagrams below to demonstrate what happens when you crochet a large granny square with self-striping yarn and either turn the work for each round, or don’t turn it and keep the colors moving in the same direction.

In both diagrams I used equal amounts of five colors, filling the grid from the black center square outward in rounds like a granny square. The arrows show the beginning of rounds and colors changes, as well as the direction they are moving; the little squares indicate where each color ends.

This first diagram shows what the colors do when the work is turned and the direction of the color reverses at the beginning of each round, as indicated by the arrows. Notice how the concentric squares break down as you move outward from the center, and the colors eventually bunch up on one side or the other:

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

Diagram 1: Turning the work

In this second diagram I filled in the colors in a continuous counterclockwise direction, again as indicated by the arrows. Notice that while the concentric squares are not perfect, they do hold up pretty well:

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

Diagram 2: Not turning the work

The result

Once I figured this out, I frogged what I’d done (thankfully, not too much) and started over, never turning the work but always working counterclockwise. In order to do this, I had to start even-numbered rounds differently than I did odd-numbered rounds. And when the granny square was complete, because it was never turned it had a definite right side (the side that faced me as I crocheted) and a wrong side.

Except for these two small differences, the pattern is the same as for my original granny square cocoon cardigan, including the recommendation to make the granny square at least half the height of the intended wearer, plus an extra inch or two. (You can make it bigger, as some patterns suggest, but I’ve found that my formula results in a nice bottom-covering length and 3/4 sleeves, and doesn’t risk overwhelming the wearer.)

For your convenience, the modified pattern is below in full. As with the original pattern, you can make this cardigan in just three easy steps with only advanced-beginner level crochet skills.

Some final notes about the yarn

Because I was trying out a new pattern variation, in an abundance of caution I bought five Caron Cakes, which totals about 1915 yards of yarn – much more than I needed. In fact, I completed the 36″ granny square using just 2-1/2 cakes. I could have done all of the binding, stitching and borders using the remaining half of the third cake, but I wanted the binding and stitching to be all the same color in which the granny square ended (the dark gray) and the borders to be all the next color (the light gray), so to get those colors I did do a minimal amount of “slicing and dicing” of the remainder of the third cake and a tiny amount of the fourth cake. What’s left of the third and fourth cakes is plenty for some small future project. I returned the untouched fifth cake for a refund.

Finally, when selecting your Caron Cakes (or other self-striping yarn), pay attention to the colors in which each skein begins and ends, and make sure they correspond. That is, if the first skein ends in, say, dark blue, you want the second skein to begin in that same dark blue, and so on.

Pattern: Granny square cocoon cardigan

Materials you’ll need:

  • 3 or 4 Caron Cakes, depending on intended size of cardigan (and your tolerance for “slicing and dicing”), or 1000-1250 yards of a medium weight (#4) self-striping yarn of your choice
  • Size J crochet hook
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Yarn needle

Stitches used

  • Chain stitch (ch)
  • Slip stitch (sl st)
  • Single crochet (sc)
  • Double crochet (dc)

To connect new skeins of yarn, I recommend using the Russian join, which reduces the number of weave-ins required.

Step 1: Crochet a BIG granny square

Ch 6 and join in a ring with sl st.

Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as first dc here and for all odd-numbered rounds throughout), 2 dc in ring, ch 2, * (3 dc in ring, ch 2) 3 times, sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Tip: Lay yarn end along ring and crochet Round 1 over it for an effortless weave-in.

Round 2: Ch 3 (counts as last dc here and for all even-numbered rounds throughout), (ch 1, 3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in first three ch 2 spaces to form corners, (ch 1, 3 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in fourth ch 2 space, sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

In even-numbered rounds, your starting chain 3 leads into a cluster of three double crochet stitches; it counts as the last double crochet in the space to its right. You will make a fourth chain which counts as a chain 1 space, and then continue with clusters and spaces as normal. When you’ve reached and crocheted in the space to the right of your starting chain, you will slip stitch in the third chain of the starting chain, leaving the fourth chain (the chain 1 space) alone.

Round 3: Ch 3, (2 dc in ch 1 space), (ch 1, 3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in each ch 2 space in corner and (ch 1, 3 dc) in each ch 1 space on side, ch 1 and sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan

In odd-numbered rounds, your starting chain 3 leads into a chain 1 space on its left and counts as the first double crochet in that space. When you complete that round, you’ll make a final chain 1 space and then slip stitch into the top of the chain 3. (When you’re making a granny square by turning to start each round, each round will begin and end like this.)

Round 4: Ch 3, (ch 1, 3 dc) in each ch 1 space on side and (ch 1, 3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in each ch 2 space in corner, in final ch 1 space (ch 1, 2 dc), sl st in top of starting ch 3.

Repeat Rounds 3 and 4 until square reaches desired size.

Final round (“binding”): Ch 1, sc in each dc and through each ch 1 space on sides; in corners, 4 sc through ch 2 space; sl st in starting ch 1, cut 6” tail and fasten off.

Step 2: Stitch together sides forming armholes

Note: If you want to see how the cardigan is constructed from the granny square (stitching the side seams and adding borders – steps that remain unchanged from my original pattern) look at at my original pattern post or watch this two-minute video:

Fold square in half with right sides together to form a rectangle, taking care to align 3 dc clusters and ch 1 spaces to the clusters and spaces on the opposite side.

Note: The right side will be the side that always faced you as you crocheted the granny square.

Beginning 7” from fold, single crochet through all loops of “binding” (final round sc) to end of side and through first 2 ch of corner only.

Note: Beginning 7” from fold creates a 14” armhole which will fit most. If necessary, the armhole size can be adjusted smaller or larger by starting the side seam closer to or farther from the fold.

Cut 6” end and fasten off.

Repeat on other side.

Step 3: Add borders

For the front opening and both armholes:

Round 1: Join yarn with sl st in sc “binding” near one of the side seams made in Step 2, ch 1, sc in each sc of “binding” until you reach ch 1, sl st in ch 1.

Tip: Crochet Round 1 over yarn ends left from binding and side seams for effortless weave-ins.

Rounds 2-6: Ch 1, sc around front opening until you reach ch 1, sl st in ch 1.

Cut 6” end and fasten off.

Weave in ends. (If you crocheted over all previous yarn ends, and used the Russian join to add new skeins of yarn, you should only have three ends left to weave in.)

If you use this pattern…

I would love to see any cardigans made from this pattern! You can email photos to spoonsandhooks@gmail.com. (Note: I’ll assume that sending me photos gives me permission to share them on the Spoons & Hooks site and social media — crediting you, of course — unless you specifically instruct me otherwise.)

Do you have any questions about this pattern? If so, ask them in the comments section, and I’ll do my best to respond promptly.

You are free to gift, donate or sell for profit any items you make from this pattern. I ask only that if you sell items made from any of my patterns, as a courtesy you reference spoonsandhooks.com as the pattern’s source.

Free crochet pattern: Self-striping granny square cocoon cardigan